The Finjein

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Lebanese_coffee

 

A scent that always piques my interest, stronger the closer to it I become. Steam rises, softly blowing it away I take my first drink in this little white Finjein (cup) with green and red floral print. A cup of coffee somehow changes that lifeless sound of nothing there. ‘tfadalo a’l ahwe” (come in for coffee), almost everyone you meet will ask you to join them at home for coffee. As people we are always eager to connect and socialize with others. Coffee has always been a popular tool to socialize with other people in many occasions.

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A Visual Memory

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Set in 1975, West Beirut recreates the initial stages of Lebanon’s civil war through the experiences of three teenagers: Muslim friends Tarek and Omar, and the Christian neighbor May, not that religion or politics concern them very much. Tarek is more preoccupied with pop, sex, smoking and his beloved cine camera. Indeed, the division of Beirut into Christian-controlled East and Muslim West is simply an excuse to skip school. The three of them have several adventures in the chaotic streets patrolled by Muslim militias.

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A Magical Time of the Year

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Christmas is a special time of year, a time filled with festivities and cheer. The lights are up, magic fills the air as people rush to get gifts. Children wait in anticipation for Father Christmas and all the gifts they will be receiving. All the wrapped presents under the tree topped with a golden star for all to see. But those gifts don’t at all compare to the beauty of having the family around. As we start this solemn slalom towards a week that ends engorged, with stomachs bloated whilst we gloat and toast a perfect holiday, let us remember that December is about reunion, love, and sharing this small world we inhabit.

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Beauty in Geometry

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Saloua Raouda Choucair is a pioneer of abstract art in the Middle East. Born in 1916, she takes her rightful position as a significant figure in the history of twentieth-century art. Beirut is very important to her. It’s where she was born. She loves this city. She isn’t nostalgic of it she says. She believes in the future, trusting the exploration of science and space.

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