Tannourine in my Heart

post 144/365

tannourine_lg-1

Winter casts a veil of snowy white upon our mountains, as spring breathes life into our rivers and waterfalls. Listening to the sounds of nature and discovering hidden gems make life in this small country an absolute dream. As you drive up from Batroun along a scenic road up the hills and mountains, Tannourine with its entire natural splendor opens up like a woman’s bust embracing the horizon beneath it.

Continue reading

Taking Pride in our Heritage

post 132/365

 

Things we never thought

Thoughts we never think

Things we put behind

Things we never find

Things we never forget

Never wondering why

Times that we forget

And things we burry behind

Things that we miss

Are easily found

 

Things we never hide are our

Heritage, Roots, and Pride

 

Youmna Medlej is a photojournalist born in 1956. She studied photography in France and started making reportages on geographic and historical landmarks upon her return to Lebanon,  as a way for Lebanese to rediscover their country after the war. But it was during her participation in Solidere’s excavations in the early 1990s that she discovered and developed her passion for heritage and archeology. At the time, the market was virtually devoid of heritage-oriented material. She thus resolved to introduce the young and old readers to the most prominent cultural and historic icons of their country.

Continue reading

A Love Story on Nahr Ibrahim

post 107/365

aphrodite__adonis_and_the_blood_red_anemone_by_axellie-d5kz78x.jpg

It is said that Adonis was born of the illicit union between King Theias of Smyrna and his daughter Myrrha at Byblos. Urged on by Aphrodite herself, the goddess of beauty, love and sexual desire, who had been offended when King Theias forgot to make a sacrifice for her, Myrrha had made unsuccessful amorous advances towards her father. One night, she managed to lure him out into the open and there under cover of darkness she laid with him. As dawn broke, Theias discovered to his utter disgust the deception of his daughter and with sword in hand chased her into the wild, wanting to punish her.

Continue reading

The Cliché

post 99/365

IMG_4097

 

Nothing in this world compares to the feeling
 of gliding through a rocky mountain gliding under the skis, silently and feeling like you’re, for once, at peace. White snow covers the land with the coolness of winter’s kiss. The warmth of the sun never leaves
 this country as the cold settles in. Winter swims, hikes, and skiing with the scent of chill 
ting the air. 
The breeze circles, lost,
 caught in winter’s snare.
 Its bitter currents whispered 
through a miasma of cold waves.

 A world encased in this winters kiss
  swims in the sun’s dying rays. I, on the other hand, sit on the beach and enjoy this motley of fading blues 
entombed in the silence of space.

Continue reading

The Fall of Tripoli

post 92/365

Siege_of_Tripoli_Painting_(1289).jpg

 

Lebanon’s second largest city is famous for its medieval Mamluk architecture, including a bustling and labyrinthine souk that is considered the best in the country. Home to the largest fortress in Lebanon, the Citadel of Raymond Saint-Gilles, it’s the second largest city (behind Cairo) in Mamluk architectural heritage. In ancient times, it was the center of a Phoenician confederation, which included Tyre, Sidon and Arados, hence the name Tripolis, meaning triple city in Greek, which the Arabs changed to Trablous.

Continue reading