The Knight

post 46/365

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The Phoenician wall is a beautiful historical landmark on the coast of the city of Batroun. Batroun is considered to be one of the most important towns during the Phoenician period. The Wall is thought to be the inspiration for the town’s name by some historians. Batroun is thought to come from the Arabic word “bater” meaning to cut. This is in reference to the wall “cutting” the sea to protect Batroun from potentially destructive tidal waves. Other historians believe that the name of the town is derivative of the Phoenician words, beit truna, which translates to house of the chief.

Spreading across 225 meters and measuring around 1.5 meter in width, it is an impressive structure that will leave you in awe of the town’s heritage. Its remains have stood the test of time. While parts of the wall have crumbled, it remains surprisingly well preserved.

Walking through old Batroun’s winding alleys with its tall date trees scattered here and there, we turn left to reach a small street of no real significance. There behind an old stone door, with a little stone cross perched on top of it, that of Our Lady of the Sea church (refer to the post Our Lady of the Sea), lies a magnificent view; the Mediterranean sea open far and wide and the Phoenician wall facing it gallantly like a shining knight. As the sea breeze swirls and dances on the terrace of the church, you can’t help but feel a precious serenity that can only be found in forgotten spiritual places.

Have you ever looked out at the sea? Really looked, as if you were looking for a lost one? Gazing at the sea with this superb wall guarding this ancient city is truly a humbling experience. This wall survives there behind a small corner church, desolate, alone, surrounded by the great big blue sea. This sea ebbing, flowing
 endlessly repetitious,
 wearing down
 the soft shells and hard stones. Riding along it’s currents,
 the sea never rests,
 forever tearing away at the flesh of that wall. That wall that stands there silently accepting its fate with pride and knowledge that nothing lasts forever. Both are prisoners 
trapped in empty spaces, floating weightless
 in the sea of forgotten time.

Because Batroun is truly a magical place, I #livelovelebanon and I will #fighton

 

 

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